Fever-free Zones

Proactive Childcare Coronavirus Prevention Measures

About fever-free zones

In order to protect the health and safety of our community and prevent the further spread of the novel coronavirus, participating WeeCare providers are submitting daily temperature reports demonstrating their daycare is fever-free.

We understand that this system does not eliminate all risks, however our goal is to be proactive in taking precautionary measures to help prevent the further spread of COVID-19 as recommended by the Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control.

Photo of Jessica Chang, Co-founder and CEO of Weecare

Jessica Chang

WeeCare
Co-founder & CEO

Look for the health status badge

When a daycare demonstrates their home has been fever-free, the health status banner will appear with a timestamp of their last temperature report.

Find fever-free daycares near you
Example photo of WeeCare native application

How fever-free badges are earned

WeeCare activities program

Daily temperature readings

Participating WeeCare providers opt-in to video temperature checks for themselves and the children enrolled in their daycare confirming no temperature readings above 99°.

Regular hand washing throughout the day

Limited close personal interactions

Regular disinfecting of surfaces, toys and frequently touched objects

Mandatory home-stay if child shows signs of sickness

What childcare providers need to know about Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Symptoms

If you, a member of your family, or a child in your care displays any of the symptoms of novel coronavirus you should seek advice from your medical provider regarding immediate medical treatment and notify the parents immediately. Symptoms of the novel coronavirus include the following:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Severe illness
How the virus is transmitted

The virus is spread like other respiratory illnesses such as the flu. Human coronavirus is most commonly spread to others from an infected person through the following:

  • Droplets produced through coughing and sneezing
  • Cough
  • Touching an object or surface with the virus on it, then touching your mouth, nose, or eyes before washing your hands


As the novel Coronavirus is new, how it spreads and how long it takes for people to become sick is still to be determined.

Ways to prevent the spread of the virus

Following the recommendations from the Department of Health and the Center of Disease Control to prevent the further spread of the virus, we recommend the following:

  • Make sure all surfaces are as clean as possible. Disinfect frequently touched objects and areas (such as doorknobs, desks, chairs, bathrooms, toys, and books) and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Wash your hands often and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds after using the restroom, before eating, after coughing, after sneezing, and after blowing your nose. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with 60-95% alcohol. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home when you are sick. If you have a fever over 99 degrees, stay home for at least 24 hours. If you are coughing excessively, cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Get a flu vaccination, if you haven't done so already.
  • Identify your medical provider and know who to call, when needed.
Guidance in the case of virus identification

Following the recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control on steps to take should an ill student or staff member attend your facility prior to being confirmed as a COVID-19 case:

  • Temporary dismissal of your school, at the recommendation of local health officials.
  • Notify and work with the local health department to communicate the possible exposure to the novel coronavirus.
  • Stay home when you are sick. If you have a fever over 99 degrees, stay home for at least 24 hours. If you are coughing excessively, cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Work with local health officials to determine when any confirmed staff or students identified with the novel coronavirus should return to your facility.
  • Identify your medical provider and know who to call, when needed.


For more up-to-date information on the novel coronavirus, we ask that you refer to the Centers for Disease Control’s Frequently Asked Questions and Answers which is also available in Spanish and Chinese.

Resources

For more up-to-date information on the novel coronavirus, we ask that you refer to the Centers for Disease Control’s Frequently Asked Questions and Answers which is also available in Spanish and Chinese.

FAQs